Untitled

We could always watch Morse
If we’re staying up all night.
Or Only Fools And Horses.
You know I have the box sets.

Disney films if you want,
Toy Story, marathon all three;
Maybe Frozen then Aladdin?
Or maybe even Hercules?

We could laugh at Hyacinth Buckét,
Fawlty Towers or O-O-O-O-Porridge.
Dad’s Army? Whose line is it anyway?
Or what about The Two Ronnies?

And American Graffiti’s fine by me
If The Blues Brothers is fine by you,
And there’s Monty Python or Les Mis?
You decide, you choose.

We can quote Blackadder of course:
‘I dreamt once that I was a sausage roll’
I’ll even stop at Blackadder Goes Fourth
If you tire of the ‘endless poetry’.

***

So why don’t we go then, you and I,
To old comedies and older songs?
Far from your cuckold and my harlot;
Where summer’s day’s are long.

Box Sets

By Ryan Havers

(via ryanhavers)

thelovelyseas:

Starfish ling to a rock at the bottom of a large kelp forest by Mauricio Handler

thelovelyseas:

Starfish ling to a rock at the bottom of a large kelp forest by Mauricio Handler

thelovelyseas:

yet another blue starfish by Paul Cowell on Flickr.

updownsmilefrown:

Debbie Harry, 1970s

by Rikki Ercoli

thelovelyseas:

Starfish Variatials by V Taitano on Flickr.
thelovelyseas:

Coral reef half and half by scott1e2310 on Flickr.
architecturia:

Love Log Cabins On t lovely art

architecturia:

Love Log Cabins On t lovely art

books0977:

In the Theatre I (1906-07). Marianne von Werefkin (Russian, 1860-1938). Tempera and gouache on paper laid down on board.
Werefkin created a distinctive style by assimilating the ‘surface painting’ of Paul Gauguin and Louis Anquetin with the ideals of Der Blaue Reiter, which included a desire to express spiritual truths through their art and a firm belief in the connection between visual art and music. This work reflects Werefkin’s interest in the French Impressionist school, capturing urban entertainment venues such as operas, theatres and cafés.

books0977:

In the Theatre I (1906-07). Marianne von Werefkin (Russian, 1860-1938). Tempera and gouache on paper laid down on board.

Werefkin created a distinctive style by assimilating the ‘surface painting’ of Paul Gauguin and Louis Anquetin with the ideals of Der Blaue Reiter, which included a desire to express spiritual truths through their art and a firm belief in the connection between visual art and music. This work reflects Werefkin’s interest in the French Impressionist school, capturing urban entertainment venues such as operas, theatres and cafés.